fungus

Winter Lichens 3

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CO trail 2-4-16 Julie and cliff 2

Julie, Olga and I went out to view the white and wonderful woods after the big snow a couple days ago, and I, of course, had a secret agenda to also check on the Little Ones. As soon as the new snow warmed slightly the snow fleas were out hopping around. I knew the lichen would not be hopping around! But they do show their colors in the snow and I am still searching for new species. Each day in the forest brings the possibility of meeting a new lichen (as well as whatever other wonders appear whenever one stays in the woods a while). We are walking on Cutoff Trail. The ice has formed curtains along the rock walls, as it has almost everywhere this year.

CO trail 2-4-16 icefall

No ice caves here, just a small cliff. The rock is mostly covered with liverwort, moss, fern; the lichen are small. One of my favorite trees, the river birch with its beautiful coppery bark, stands here.

CO trail 2-4-16 lichen on river birch

The lichen like this tree too; the moist base has a colony of aqua blue lichen. Aren’t they beautiful on the red and silver bark? Since the names are not verified yet, I can describe them any way I wish, in this blog anyway! Don’t worry, names will be forthcoming by spring.

Turkeys flapped around in the treetops. The sun came out. On the south slope, snow in the branches began to melt, just enough to form liquid water at the edges of the snow on each branch. The trees were suddenly illuminated in diamonds of light. A few moments later as we walked away from the direct sunshine, the warming air simply made the clumps of snow in the branches fall off on our heads.

This is not a lichen, it is a fungus, making a little snow sculpture on the side of a tree.

CO trail 2-4-16 tree fungus

While we move about so quickly and ceaselessly, the trees, moss, rocks and lichen quietly remain. The ice moves too. More slowly than us but faster than lichen, rock or tree; changing all those slow moving ones as it forms, grows and then disappears. The lichen and their rocks and trees will be here as we and the ice come and go.  CO trail 2-4-16 icicles g

CO trail lichen under ice 2-4-16

Remember to enjoy the small things in life.

 

Winter Lichens Part 2

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Remember this, from a week ago? A little frosty but still green and growing.BHrock lichen 6 w side of hill frozen

Today, January 10th, it was 5 degrees above zero and this is my lichen hunting outfit; every layer of Canadian ski clothes I can find:

Winter lichen hunting outfit

And here’s Lichen Land now:

Home 1-10-16 lichen under ice rock face

But as we know, the lichen are quietly waiting for the ice to melt. Meanwhile the ice is busy make beautiful patterns. I wonder what it looks like from underneath, where the lichens are?

Home 1-10-16 lichen under ice 2

Since it was so cold today, I went out to see what the lichens looked like on the hill behind our house. As I searched for them in the ice and snow I thought about how quickly they exchange their active life for dormancy. Another warm day and these ice covered lichen will be back to life in a few hours.

Below: very cold lichen

Home 1-10-16 lichen zero degrees in slide 2

Home 1-10-16 rocks above house and fern

Home 1-10-16 above house lichen zero degrees

It’s fun to see what else is out in the woods besides the lichen.

This is the hilltop where these pictures were taken:

Home 1-10-16 point above house and east

It’s a busy place. See all the tracks? Our coyote friends like to gather in this area and sing to us. Their tracks tell the story of what they do while here.

Home 1-10-16 where the coyotes play 1

Sandstone catching the afternoon light

Home 1-10-16 rock 2 or 3a

At the top of the ridge a dead tree trunk supported these fungus

Home 1-10-16 tree fungus 5

After an hour there seemed to be more and more snow and less lichens, and it was getting colder so I went home. I went less than a quarter mile from the house and had a good adventure. What’s close to home where you live? If you’re out there and meet your own resident lichens, share them with us!